Jamie Kennedy's favorite movie review site
Home Reviews  Articles  Release Dates Coming Soon  DVD  Top 20s Criticwatch  Search
Public Forums  Festival Coverage  Contests About 
Advertisement

Overall Rating
2.88

Awesome: 0%
Worth A Look: 0%
Just Average87.5%
Pretty Crappy: 12.5%
Sucks: 0%

1 review, 2 user ratings


Latest Reviews

Wonder Wheel by Peter Sobczynski

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri by Rob Gonsalves

Swindlers, The by Jay Seaver

Oro (Gold) by Jay Seaver

Disaster Artist, The by Peter Sobczynski

Explosion by Jay Seaver

Lucky (2017) by Rob Gonsalves

Breadwinner, The by Jay Seaver

Endless, The by Jay Seaver

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets by Rob Gonsalves

subscribe to this feed


Death Race 2
[AllPosters.com] Buy posters from this movie
by brianorndorf

"Miracles occur when away from Paul W.S. Anderson"
3 stars

“Death Race 2” isn’t actually a sequel, but a prequel detailing the creation of the unstoppable, iron-masked driving force known as Frankenstein, portrayed in the original 1975 film by the late David Carradine. The picture doesn’t exactly answer all the burning questions left behind by the dreadful Paul W.S. Anderson motion picture from 2008, but it’s a start. And not a half-bad one either, effortlessly surpassing its forefather with a scrappier take on head-bashing, car-smashing matters of a dystopian future.

When a breezy bank robbery job arranged by criminal kingpin Kane (Sean Bean) goes horribly wrong, ace getaway driver Lucas (Luke Goss) is arrested and sent to the vicious prison, Terminal Island, currently housing the inhuman televised game show “Death Match,” where prisoners are forced to battle hand-to-hand for their lives. Run by deviant producer/host September Jones (Lauren Cohan), “Death Match” is struggling for ratings, requiring a special relaunch to make it a smash success. Matched up with Goldberg (Danny Trejo), Lists (Frederick Koehler), and his trusty navigator Katrina (Tanit Phoenix), Lucas is urged to join the new “Death Race” show, where prisoners speed around a guarded track in weaponized cars, looking to kill one another for a chance at freedom. With a substantial price on his head thanks to Kane’s paranoia, Lucas enters the competition, quickly recognizing everyone wants him dead.

A modest success for Anderson, “Death Race” certainly didn’t warrant a continuation. Really, once you’ve seen one visually mangled automobile race to the death, you’ve seen them all. “Death Race 2” elects the popular commercial route of prequelization, taking viewers back to a time when the prisoners on Terminal Island only had crude handheld weapons to mangle one another, with the Weyland Corporation capturing all the bloodlust for big time T.V. ratings. Ah, those were the days. Before the cars, Anderson, and star Jason Statham.

To comfortably marry the two features, the prequel hauls in Statham lookalike Goss, who does his best to look constipated and remain shirtless throughout the entire film. It’s a thankless role for the budding DTV prince, but he manages to supply the picture with a minuscule sense of personality, leaving the burden of charisma to the supporting cast, including a loopy turn from Ving Rhames, who relentlessly chews scenery as the Weyland Corporation founder and Terminal Island owner. Of course, genuine acting skill isn’t the priority here. Why else would the producers cast Cohan, seen here setting back the feminist movement with an agonizing, cleavage-popping performance of ultimate whoredom (misogyny is of paramount importance to this knuckle-dragging franchise). Nah, we’ve all come for the gore, the guns, and the grease-stained grimaces.

The most impressive aspects to director Roel Reine’s film are the stunt work and crisp cinematography, giving fans of the first film another round of brutal races and beatings, only this time the picture appears to embrace its feral nature with a little more spunk. Bodies are flung, cars explode, and Reine keeps an OCD command of the slo-mo dial, making for a visually stimulating picture that keeps to basic ingredients, working a script from Tony Giglio that doesn’t show interest in labored backstories, preferring to speed ahead with the violence. The minimalism is enchanting, leaving Reine with little to do but orchestrate the warrior clashes and race sequences. Of course, nasty editorial habits remain, but the primary colors are well tended to here, making for an intermittently entertaining actioner.

Even with a considerably smaller budget and an absence of Statham, “Death Race 2” manages to find a more thrilling edge to known elements, providing the occasionally rousing viewing experience Anderson was incapable of producing the first time around. It’s lumbering and a too permissive with the limited actors, but the sequel/prequel has a few moments of mouthbreathing excitement. How did Frankenstein come to be? Who really cares, but at least “Death Race 2” provides a few clenched-fist jolts before reaching its meaningless conclusion.

link directly to this review at http://www.hollywoodbitchslap.com/review.php?movie=20388&reviewer=404
originally posted: 01/14/11 08:48:00
[printer] printer-friendly format  

User Comments

5/15/11 stephen nettles Not even in the same ball park as the first. 2 stars
3/19/11 jessica edwards It was good, one of the better prequels... 3 stars
IF YOU'VE SEEN THIS FILM, RATE IT!
Note: Duplicate, 'planted,' or other obviously improper comments
will be deleted at our discretion. So don't bother posting 'em. Thanks!
Your Name:
Your Comments:
Your Location: (state/province/country)
Your Rating:


Discuss this movie in our forum

USA
  N/A
  DVD: 18-Jan-2011

UK
  N/A

Australia
  N/A


Directed by
  Roel Reiné

Written by
  Tony Giglio

Cast
  Luke Goss
  Ving Rhames
  Sean Bean
  Danny Trejo
  Frederick Koehler
  Lauren Cohan



Home Reviews  Articles  Release Dates Coming Soon  DVD  Top 20s Criticwatch  Search
Public Forums  Festival Coverage  Contests About 
Privacy Policy | | HBS Inc. |   
All data and site design copyright 1997-2017, HBS Entertainment, Inc.
Search for
reviews features movie title writer/director/cast