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Overall Rating
4.56

Awesome79.41%
Worth A Look: 11.76%
Just Average: 0%
Pretty Crappy: 2.94%
Sucks: 5.88%

2 reviews, 22 user ratings


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Face In The Crowd, A
[AllPosters.com] Buy posters from this movie
by Rob Gonsalves

"Griffith at his best."
5 stars

On a recent episode of "The View," Whoopi Goldberg prescribed a viewing of 1957’s "A Face in the Crowd" as a way of understanding Donald Trump’s unaccountable popularity among a small segment of the populace. The movie explains more than that, actually.

A primer on the ease and dangers of American demagoguery, A Face in the Crowd sets its sights on a drunk drifter and takes him all the way up to the position of political kingmaker. Larry “Lonesome” Rhodes (Andy Griffith) goes a long way on cornpone aw-shucks charm, most of which he consciously ladles on. Rhodes has a sharp, shrewd mind, and people underestimate him at their peril; he has an instinctive comprehension of the relatively new medium of television, and he uses it to sell products — energy pills, candidates. Same thing.

Rhodes is discovered in an Arkansas jail by radio reporter Marcia Jeffries (Patricia Neal), and soon enough she regrets her role in “making” him (she even dubs him Lonesome). Rhodes segues from radio to a local TV station to a major New York network. He can’t seem to step wrong. His listeners/viewers love his honesty, and when he ridicules his first sponsor, a mattress company, sales of their mattresses rise 55%. Marcia and one of Rhodes’ writers, Mel Miller (Walter Matthau), look on in dismay. They know Rhodes is starting to rot behind the mask. There he is on his top-rated show, enabling a senator’s explanation of why Social Security is un-American. Daniel Boone, after all, wouldn’t have needed it.

Griffith’s hungry, lunging performance (it was his film debut) is a shock and a revelation to anyone who knows him primarily from The Andy Griffith Show or, God knows, Matlock. Rhodes wasn’t the last villain Griffith played, but it was most likely his most vulnerable and recognizable. Rhodes’ impish, vulpine grin and ferocious cackle — Whitman’s barbaric yawp in full frightening effect — complete the mask, the face that the crowd wants to see. In one respect, it’s the audience’s fault for buying into Rhodes’ patter, because they need someone to believe in, someone to give that power to. If it isn’t him, it’ll be someone else. The audience is gullible but also fickle, and is always looking for a reason to discontinue its belief.

Budd Schulberg’s script verges on didactic at times but never quite tumbles over. As sociopolitical satire, the movie was decades ahead of its time, even scooping 1976’s Network. The acting, especially by Griffith and Neal, is witty but primal at times, almost Kabuki-like (also note Neal’s silent-horror-film method of indicating distress by clutching her face). There were moments when I was afraid on behalf of various characters in a room with the raging Rhodes, even though, aside from a bar fight he gets into (but doesn’t start), he’s never particularly violent. He’s never too far away from hysteria, though. One of the film’s virtues is showing us the burden of Rhodes’ cult of personality. He got where he is by artificial honesty, and now he can’t ever say what he truly feels or it’s all over.

I’m not sure what, if anything, that says to us about Mr. Trump, but it bears remembering no matter who steps up to a podium to sell us a pill, a candidate, or a war.

link directly to this review at http://www.hollywoodbitchslap.com/review.php?movie=2254&reviewer=416
originally posted: 08/03/15 17:04:09
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User Comments

7/30/17 FireWithFire Elia Kazan's 2nd anti-White Southerner propaganda "films" 1 stars
1/14/16 Robin J A frighteningly true through-the-looking-glass take on politics and TV. 5 stars
2/27/11 R.W. Welch A shade over-the-top, but has some sharp writing. 4 stars
4/22/09 PAUL SHORTT A BRILLIANTLY CINEMATIC MELODRAMA ABOUT THE MORALS AND THE MEDIA 5 stars
8/21/05 DM The makers of this film are psychics. 5 stars
9/21/04 bob Good film 4 stars
1/12/04 Rebecka Tew It has a good message--very much teaches truth. The ending gave me something to think abou 5 stars
10/09/03 Clawed Le Mew More relevant today than ever 5 stars
12/27/02 Latta Layne Everyone should watch this movie! Griffith is amazing. This ain't Mayberry! 5 stars
10/14/02 Carswell Lonesome Rhodes is irritating 2 stars
5/21/02 Richard Bowen Not to be missed. Andy Griffith's performance is riveting. 5 stars
4/12/02 sam phillips the best movies ever made! 5 stars
3/01/02 Jeff Mangum A wonderful comment on the political power of television 4 stars
2/25/02 jclemons@home.com Virtually ignored film; buried by tv powers. 5 stars
11/10/01 Elkin Brown Eerily prophetic about the current unholy relationship between politics and entertainment 5 stars
10/14/01 gus never seen it - i just dont like elia kazan... 1 stars
10/07/01 Bobbie Stoehr I loved this movie. I watched in my Liturature II class. 4 stars
9/13/01 Scott Lind Who'd have thought it from Andy G.? 5 stars
9/10/01 James Keig stellar 5 stars
8/10/00 Curmudgeon Excellent! Prescient! On the mark. I can't believe I fissed this at the time it premiered. 5 stars
4/24/00 bill benzon this is a keeper 5 stars
2/16/00 John Linton Roberson Bizarrely ahead of its time. SEE IT. 5 stars
IF YOU'VE SEEN THIS FILM, RATE IT!
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USA
  01-Nov-1957

UK
  N/A

Australia
  N/A


Directed by
  Elia Kazan

Written by
  Budd Schulberg

Cast
  Andy Griffith
  Patricia Neal
  Anthony Franciosa
  Walter Matthau
  Lee Remick



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