Hollywood Bitchslap Forum Index Hollywood Bitchslap
Community Forum
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

BOOKS!

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Hollywood Bitchslap Forum Index -> Off-Topic Chat
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
TheAngryJew
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 12 Jul 2002
Posts: 5525
Location: Philadelphia

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 7:06 am    Post subject: BOOKS! Reply with quote

I used to read constantly. Mostly horror, but not always. Over the last four or five years I've kinda slowed down in the reading department, mainly because movies, video games, and writing are pretty time-consuming activities. Anyway, I'm now reading two books that are so damn excellent that I WISH I had to poop more often because that's when I get the best reading done.

The first book is called I Love You, Beth Cooper, written by Simpsons scribe / screenwriter / columnist Larry Doyle. Every syllable of the book screams for a cinematic adaptation (with Paul Dano as the lead), and good god is it funny. Here's my most recent favorite sentence: "The paw was human, Denis surmised, from the way its thumb was opposed deeply into his throat." Heh.

Oh, and the second book is Watchmen. No, I'd never read it. And yes, it's as awesome as everyone says.

Thoughts on these books? What are YOU reading these days?
_________________
Scott Weinberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Collin Souter
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 13 Jul 2002
Posts: 856
Location: Prospect Hts. IL

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just finished Stephen Colbert's I Am America and So Can You!", which is a riot and a half. Now, I'm reading Chuck Klosterman's Sex, Drugs and Cocoa-Puffs, which is just a bunch of pop culture essays. I don't always agree with the guy, but he's damn good at stirring the pot and making his point.

I also recommend Paul Fieg's book that came out a couple years ago, Superstud: Or How I Became a 24-Year-Old Virgin.
_________________
Chicago Film Critics Association
Nick Digilio Show, WGN Radio, AM 720
myspace.com/breakupdate
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kand El
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 23 Sep 2004
Posts: 1684
Location: New York

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Currently going through a Kim Newman Marathon of all his novels which can be a bit thick for an American as he goes heavy with lots of English colloquialisms, but the one I would start anyone on is called Anno Dracula a brilliant re-imagining of Victorian England if Van Helsing and his band failed to stop the Count. Magnificent, and something I've wanted to see on the big screen for at least a decade. Very accessible to anyone.

Watchmen is worth being taken in by everyone, particularly before the Zack Snyder helmed adaptation hits screens, as Alan Moore has already distanced himself from it. The book could be seen as dated, but when considering it too, is an alternate history where America won the Cold war through use of superheroes (as one of its many, many subplots), its perhaps not so much dated as effective in showing a neutered Russia simmering beneath America's heel, much like now. Me, I know the perfect way to bring this to the screen in a perfect adaptation with a perfect ending, but hey, nobody's calling to ask, so in my head it stays.

League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Volume 3 - Black Dossier- while not as emotionally compelling or perhaps viscerally exciting as its two predecessors, still an entertaining yarn that is a must for anyone who has devoured the first two volumes as I have (this is my Harry Potter), as it is one of the most ambitious projects I've seen from Alan Moore as he tells the story of the Leagues through the ages, from a lost Folio of famous biographer William Shakespeare (iambic pentameter and all) to a pornographic autobiography from famed Grand Horizontale Fanny Hill to a Beatnik account of a strange encounter in San Francisco (honestly my least favorite part of the book due to my inability to decypher beatnik rapid-fire jargon) to the journals of a slightly clueless Reverend of some dire and foul doings in Massachusetts by way of the Great Old Ones.

Hollywood Nocturnes- James Ellroy- for those that might just want to dip their toes rather that dive in to his circuititous, serpentine novels where you would probably have to start with Black Dahlia and end with the Cold Six Thousand, these series of short stories on the doings and undoings of LA's fetid underbelly capture Ellroy's machine gun prose, unequalled style, and hardcore grit, but in a more digestible, compact form for new readers, pleasing long-time fans with his talent for portraying justice doled out by men of will.

That's all I can think of for now, but I get quite a bit of reading done given my looooong commute.
_________________
I am L. Pete Morton.


Last edited by Kand El on Wed Nov 28, 2007 10:46 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jack Sommersby
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 12 Dec 2002
Posts: 4422
Location: Helena, Montana

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are some, Scott:

F. Paul Wilson's The Keep -- which is far superior to Michael Mann's awful adaptation of it. (And, yes, I know there was a fair amount of studio interference with the project.)

Lawrence Block's 8 Million Ways to Die -- which is also superior to the adaptation. It's the best detective novel ever written and my favorite book of all-time.

David Wiltse's A Prayer for the Dead -- the best serial-killer thriller ever written.

Stephen Bach's invaluable Final Cut, which details the disastrous making of the notorious flop Heaven's Gate. (Julie Salamon's The Devil's Candy: The Anatomy of a Hollywood Fiasco, which gives the juicy details of the making of The Bonfire of the Vanities, is also good reading.)

And, finally, the phenomenal Jack Reacher series:

http://www.leechild.com/

As for what I'm currently reading, I'm in the middle of William Diehl's Show of Evil, the second of the 3-book series featuring Martin Vail (who Richard Gere played in Primal Fear.)

Happy reading!
_________________
"Joe the Plumber -- you can quote me -- is a dumbass." -- Meghan McCain
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
darkofnight



Joined: 16 Jan 2004
Posts: 143
Location: North York, ON

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you end up enjoying The Keep, I highly recommend another Wilson novel called The Tomb. Fantastic, extremely creative horror/mystery tale. They really need to make a movie out of that one day.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Jack Sommersby
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 12 Dec 2002
Posts: 4422
Location: Helena, Montana

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amen, David. It's mind-boggling how an exceptional book like this is passed over by Hollywood when cut-rate stuff like, say, Ira Levin's Sliver and Steve Shagan's The Formula get cinematic treatment. In case you don't know, there's a whole series of the Repairman Jack books:

http://www.repairmanjack.com/

I'm up to date on all of them, and The Tomb still stands as the best of the series. It's weird: Wilson went 13 years before his second RP book, and now he's churning one out every year.

I might also add Martin Cruz Smith's Russian detective series with Moscow homicide inspector Arkady Renko. Gorky Park is the first in the series and the only one that's been filmed (and not too badly, mind you).

Finally, for the scariest novel of all-time, nothing has ever come close to Dean R. Koontz's Phantoms. (Yes, it was made into a film, and a disappointingly bland one at that.)
_________________
"Joe the Plumber -- you can quote me -- is a dumbass." -- Meghan McCain
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Alex Paquin
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 16 Jul 2002
Posts: 1719
Location: Quebecland

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As you know, I'm not much into horror, so many of the titles mentioned here mean nothing to me.

I have not been known for reading fiction, but I have recently discovered George MacDonald Fraser's Flashman series. Apparently a film adaptation was made a few decades ago, but it's considered a disappointment, and although I haven't seen it I can easily guess why: three-quarters of the books' fun is in the narration. The second book in the series, Royal Flash, was a mild letdown, perhaps because I had read The Prisoner of Zenda not a year before, and because there weren't as many opportunities for Fraser to insert Flashman within a genuinely historical setting (apart from occasional meetings with Bismarck and others).

Now I'm plodding through All the King's Men; the subject fascinates me, and the 1949 film was well crafted (I haven't seen the recent adaptation), but I get the impression the author was thoroughly convinced he was producing Great Important and Meaningful Literature, which has always been a major turn-off for me. The other problem is that the edition I own is the "restored" text in which Willie Stark's name is reverted to the author's original name, Willie Talos, which, considering how famous the character has become with the changed name, is in my view a serious mistake (and apparently I'm not alone in thinking that way). (The exchange I've linked to, by the way, is a prime example of what happens when one worships the author and discards everything else as intrusion upon the author's vision. As much as I don't like, say, the studio's meddling with Orson Welles' Touch of Evil, I'm a bit sceptical about Jonathan Rosenbaum's "restoration" of the film, no matter how closely he clings to Welles' notes. I have always seen it as rewriting history; if Welles himself had redone the film, it would have been different, but the modern-day case of George Lucas, and his apparent desire to "improve" the original Star Wars films to gradually supplant the originals, is equally unsatisfactory).


Last edited by Alex Paquin on Sat Dec 01, 2007 12:32 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Rob Gonsalves
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 19 May 2006
Posts: 2024

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just took home The Diving Bell and the Butterfly and Charlie Wilson's War as homework for the movie versions. For fun there's the Colbert non-book. (Hey, he hates books.)

I might try The Kite Runner, since Marc Forster was so kind as to personally send me a copy of the book. /sarcasm
_________________
But I wish the public could, in the midst of its pleasures, see how blatantly it is being spoon-fed, and ask for slightly better dreams.

- Iris Barry, Let's Go to the Movies, 1926
----------
Shoot him again. His soul is still dancing.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Danielle Ophelia



Joined: 28 Jul 2002
Posts: 148
Location: ...

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What am I reading? Atwood, Atwood, and more Atwood. That's what I call Chick Lit. I don't know why she's described as a "feminist author", however, unless it's simply because her work centers around women. Far as ethics and principles go, she's not one to do her characters any favors. Which I totally respect and am totally down with.

Also, I went into that Zoe Heller book--Notes on a Scandal--with marginal hopes and ended up laughing my ass off. Nothing beats a social satire with a little psychological depth. I've been fending off the film adaptation, though; should I give in?

(Somebody reccommend a good horror author. I'm in the mood to go back to my roots.)
_________________
Give me all your 80s music and no one gets hurt.


Last edited by Danielle Ophelia on Sat Dec 01, 2007 10:47 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
TheAngryJew
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 12 Jul 2002
Posts: 5525
Location: Philadelphia

PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2007 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brian Lumley! Jack Ketchum! Skipp & Spector!
_________________
Scott Weinberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Thumb the Toad
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 02 Jan 2003
Posts: 895
Location: CT's alcohol capital

PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2007 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reading Ulysses by James Joyce, It by Steve King, and The Man in the High Castle by PK Dick.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Alex Paquin
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 16 Jul 2002
Posts: 1719
Location: Quebecland

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 12:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thumb the Toad wrote:
Reading Ulysses by James Joyce, It by Steve King, and The Man in the High Castle by PK Dick.


That's what I call eclectic tastes.

But tell me, is Ulysses as unreadable as they say (nothing compared to Finnegans Wake, to be sure, but Joyce has this reputation of being a difficult writer, and I wondered how much of it is true)?


Last edited by Alex Paquin on Sat Dec 01, 2007 7:44 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
MrTinkles
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 04 Dec 2002
Posts: 675
Location: Portland

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 3:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danielle Ophelia wrote:
(Somebody reccommend a good horror author. I'm in the mood to go back to my roots.)



I loved "Heart-Shaped Box" by Joe Hill. I don't read a lot of horror novels, so I'm probably not the best judge, but this one scared the poo out of me. It's quite creepy. It's gotten a lot of good reviews, too, presumably from people with more credibility with this genre than me.
_________________
Film reviews, "Snide Remarks," and assorted merriment: EricDSnider.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
MP Bartley
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 16 Jul 2002
Posts: 1818
Location: Sunderland, England

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 5:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isn't Hill the pen name for Stephen King's son?
_________________
"We hate the French! We fight wars against the French! Did all those men die in vain on the fields of Agincourt? Was the man who burned Joan of Arc just wasting good matches?"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
smrtpants



Joined: 08 Sep 2006
Posts: 255
Location: canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 9:00 am    Post subject: yes, give in Reply with quote

Danielle Ophelia wrote:
Also, I went into that Zoe Heller book--Notes on a Scandal--with marginal hopes and ended up laughing my ass off. Nothing beats a social satire with a little psychological depth. I've been fending off the film adapation, though; should I give in?


the film is medium rare verging on well done.



and nobody spells adaptation. meow.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Alex Paquin
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 16 Jul 2002
Posts: 1719
Location: Quebecland

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

smrtpants wrote:
the film is medium rare verging on well done.


Hollywood Bitchslap Bar & Grill sez: "Two Forks Up!"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Danielle Ophelia



Joined: 28 Jul 2002
Posts: 148
Location: ...

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MrTinkles wrote:
Danielle Ophelia wrote:
(Somebody reccommend a good horror author. I'm in the mood to go back to my roots.)



I loved "Heart-Shaped Box" by Joe Hill. I don't read a lot of horror novels, so I'm probably not the best judge, but this one scared the poo out of me. It's quite creepy. It's gotten a lot of good reviews, too, presumably from people with more credibility with this genre than me.


Isn't that the one about the dude who buys a ghost off EBay or something?

...

Where the hell did my avatar go?
_________________
Give me all your 80s music and no one gets hurt.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CharlesTatum



Joined: 02 Oct 2006
Posts: 1107
Location: Bismarck, North Dakota

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am reading "A History of the Popes" and The Holy Bible (King James Version), and I just finished a collection of stories about the Holocaust called "This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen" by Borowski. With Xmas rush taking all my reading and movie watching time, I mostly read "Attention Employees" signs at work!
_________________
Charles Tatum's Review Archive
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
MrTinkles
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 04 Dec 2002
Posts: 675
Location: Portland

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Danielle Ophelia"]
MrTinkles wrote:
Danielle Ophelia wrote:
(Somebody reccommend a good horror author. I'm in the mood to go back to my roots.)



I loved "Heart-Shaped Box" by Joe Hill. I don't read a lot of horror novels, so I'm probably not the best judge, but this one scared the poo out of me. It's quite creepy. It's gotten a lot of good reviews, too, presumably from people with more credibility with this genre than me.


Isn't that the one about the dude who buys a ghost off EBay or something?




It is indeed. And Joe Hill is the pseudonym of Joe King, son of Stephen. I greatly admire his using a pen name and not playing up his connection to the Master of Horror. I didn't know who he was when I read the book, so I was impressed by him all on his own.
_________________
Film reviews, "Snide Remarks," and assorted merriment: EricDSnider.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
TheAngryJew
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 12 Jul 2002
Posts: 5525
Location: Philadelphia

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I greatly admire his using a pen name and not playing up his connection to the Master of Horror.


I'd be more impressed if he did it without the PUBLISHER knowing who he is.
_________________
Scott Weinberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Rob Gonsalves
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 19 May 2006
Posts: 2024

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TheAngryJew wrote:

I'd be more impressed if he did it without the PUBLISHER knowing who he is.


Ayuh.
_________________
But I wish the public could, in the midst of its pleasures, see how blatantly it is being spoon-fed, and ask for slightly better dreams.

- Iris Barry, Let's Go to the Movies, 1926
----------
Shoot him again. His soul is still dancing.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
UDM
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 12 Jul 2002
Posts: 592
Location: Los Angeles, CA

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2007 11:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've heard that Christopher Rice couldn't get published until his famous mom stepped in and threw her weight around.

As for Joe Hill, let me guess...it's about a famous author's son who buys a possessed car that runs over psychic children.

UDM
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
natasha_theobald
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 13 Jul 2002
Posts: 2091
Location: Oregon

PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 5:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm reading A Confederacy of Dunces for the first time and loving it.

My last read was The Shadow of the Wind, also amazing. It is a must for anyone who just loves books. The idea of a cemetary for lost books is just a thrilling thought to me. The language is really rich and intriguing.

Before that, I read The Futurist, which I also would recommend. It was an interesting read at this time of high political prognostication, as the titular futurist makes his living predicting events and consequences, etc. It all comes crashing down around him one day when he wakes up and realizes he is completely full of shit.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address
Thumb the Toad
HBS Monkey
HBS Monkey


Joined: 02 Jan 2003
Posts: 895
Location: CT's alcohol capital

PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alex Paquin wrote:
Thumb the Toad wrote:
Reading Ulysses by James Joyce, It by Steve King, and The Man in the High Castle by PK Dick.


That's what I call eclectic tastes.

But tell me, is Ulysses as unreadable as they say (nothing compared to Finnegans Wake, to be sure, but Joyce has this reputation of being a difficult writer, and I wondered how much of it is true)?


Near-impossible without notes and background, possible but very challenging with.

I tried Portrait and Dubliners first, though.

King is often dismissed as a literary lightweight, but his best work is really fantastic and some of the most alternatively moving and disturbing you'll find in the genre. His recent work is pretty crappy, though.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Hollywood Bitchslap Forum Index -> Off-Topic Chat All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group